Magan Medical Clinic, Inc.
patient-portal

Dermatology

Magan Medical Clinic, Dermatology
420 W Rowland St, 2nd Floor
Covina, CA 91723

(626) 331-6411 Phone (Appointment Desk open M-F, 7:30 am – 5:30 pm)
(626) 251-1550 Fax

 

Dermatology Staff
Dermatology staff including Charles Chiang M.D., F.A.A.D. (center) &
Louis Bauman M.D., F.A.C.P (2nd from left)

 

We provide quality dermatology care with compassion. Our specialty is medical dermatology, including:

  • Acne (both teenage and adult onset; we are enrolled in iPledge if Accutane is needed)
  • Eczema / atopic dermatitis (in both children and adults)
  • Psoriasis
  • Skin cancer / skin exams
  • Moles
  • Warts / molluscum
  • Rosacea
  • Pigmentation disorders
  • Hair disorders (esp. thinning, shedding, and alopecia areata)
  • Phototherapy (we have a nbUVB booth)
  • Hives
  • Itching (pruritus)
  • Nail disorders
  • Topical therapy for photoaging and sun damage

If you have hair thinning or psoriasis, Dr. Chiang possesses special expertise. He completed fellowships in both fields at University of California, San Francisco where he saw a wide spectrum of patients (including the most severe), performed clinical trials, and published research.

We take pleasure in serving our community including Covina, West Covina, San Dimas, Rancho Cucamonga, Baldwin Park, Azusa, Glendora, Upland, El Monte, Duarte, Monrovia, Arcadia, La Puente, and Diamond Bar.

Same day urgent appointments often available. No referral is necessary for PPO insurance plans. Please call (626) 331-6411. We look forward to serving you!


 

"What’s New in..."

A monthly column by Dr. Chiang

 

July 2014

What’s New in Infantile Hemangiomas

Infantile hemangiomas are the most common tumors of infancy. They are benign blood vessel (technically a progenitor cell with neural crest and pericyte origin) tumors that typically grow rapidly then gradually involute. Involute is the term used rather than “disappear” because some can leave a fibrofatty scar. Overall, 92% involute by age 4, which was shown by two recent studies and is different than the classical teaching which was 90% involute by age 9.

IMost hemangiomas are simply followed by the primary care doctor. However, treatment is considered for those at risk for disfigurement. The concern for fibrofatty residue is more likely with hemangiomas that are larger, have a superficial component, have steep borders, or have thick infiltrative dermal involvement. Those located on the central face may have significant disfigurement as the “specific anatomic curves of the lips, nose, and philtrum do not necessarily return to normal contours after becoming distorted” (quoted from Dr. Frieden, UCSF Pediatric Dermatology, expert in hemangioma treatment).

Treatment, if used, is most often topical medication for non-ulcerated hemangiomas with a 92% efficacy and 56% regression rate, i.e. treatment helps the majority of the time but does not necessarily always eliminate the hemangioma. This is deemed at least as good as laser by Dr. Frieden. Injectable and oral (Hemangeol, propranolol) medications are also options. However, oral medications have a higher rate of side effects especially hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and pre-treatment clearance with a cardiovascular and pulmonary exam would be needed from either the primary care doctor or cardiologist. If your child has a worrisome hemangioma, I look forward to seeing him/her. Please make an appointment for a dermatology consultation at (626) 331-6411.

Charles Chiang, MD, FAAD
Board Certified Dermatologist

References:
- Freiden IJ. Infantile Hemangiomas: Past, Present, and Future. Dermatology Focus 2014
- Couto RA, et al. Infantile hemangioma: clinical assessment of the involuting phase and implications for management. Plast Reconstr Surg 2012
- Chakkittakandiyil A, et al. Timolol maleate 0.5% or 0.1% gel-forming solution for infantile hemangiomas: a retrospective, multicenter, cohort study. Pediatr Dermatol 2012
- Drolet BA, et al. Initiation and use of propranolol for infantile hemangioma: report of a consensus conference. Pediatrics 2013

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